WET POWDER / WET WOP (white)

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Chemical Name:
WET POWDER /
WET WOP (white)
Surface Used On:
Dark-colored tape surfaces.
Sensitive To:
Sebaceous & lipid components.
Development Color: Method to Record: Hazard: Protective Clothing: Fume Hood Use:

White

None

Not
Reagent Characteristics

Development Complete When:

Source of Error:

Incompatibilities:

Precautions:

Storage Container:

Safety:

Recommendations:


Similar Reagents



Sequential Reagents
(Not necessarily in this order.)



Abridged Reagent Sequence


Visual Examination
|
Forensic Light
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*** Wet Powder/Wet Wop (white) ***
|
Forensic Light

WET POWDER / WET WOP (white) FORMULA:

Not Applicable – this reagent is pre-mixed and ready-to-use.
 
PROCEDURE OF APPLICATION
 
1. Shake container before use.

2. Apply liquid using a camel hair brush to the adhesive side of tape.

3. Let the liquid set on the tape for approximately 10-15 seconds.

4. Rinse under running cold tap water until friction ridge detail appears.
 
5. Allow tape to air dry.
 
6. Photograph any developed friction ridge detail.



Ridge Detail Visualized by:

Visible paste/stain reaction.


Reagent Applicabilities:

Non-Porous surfaces
Adhesive tape surfaces


Other Chemical Name(s):

None


Working Solution Shelf-life:

Prepared and applied as needed.

Process Summary:

This reagent is a pre-mixed, ready-to-use thick powder suspended in a liquid solution. It stains latent prints on the adhesive sides of dark-colored tapes. The liquid is brushed onto the tape surface and a water rinse reveals any friction ridge detail. It is free from toxic chemicals and has an indefinite shelf life.

Accepted Deviations:

An alternative application method is to immerse tapes into a bowl containing the reagent.

Supporting Reference Materials:

1. B.J. Jones, A.J. Reynolds, M. Richardson and V. G. Sears, “Nano-scale Composition of Commercial White Powders for Development of Latent Fingerprints on Adhesives”, Science and Justice, vol. 50, 2010, pp. 150-163.

2. B.L. Martin, “Developing Latent Prints on the Adhesive Surface of Black Electrical Tape”, Jor. Forensic Identification, vol. 49, no. 2, Mar./April 1999, pp. 127-129.

3. C. Schiemer, C. Lennard, P. Maynard and C. Roux, “Evaluation of Techniques for the Detection and Enhancement of Latent Fingermarks on Black Electrical Tape”, Jor. Forensic Identification, vol. 55, no. 2, Mar./April 2005, pp. 214-231.

4. D.C. Wade, “Development of Latent Prints with Titanium Dioxide (TiO2)”, Jor. Forensic Identification, vol. 52, no. 5, Sept./Oct. 2002, pp. 551-559.

5. N.H. Williams and K.T. Elliott, “Development of Latent Prints Using Titanium Doxide (TiO2) in Small Particle Reagent, White (SPR-W) on Adhesives”, Jor. Forensic Identification, vol. 55, no. 3, May/June 2005, pp. 292-301.

6. K. M. Parisi, “Getting the Most of Your Fingerprint Powders”, Jor. Forensic Identification, vol. 49, no. 5, Sept./Oct. 2005, pp. 494-498.

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